Memoirs of Josef Boruwlaski - CHARACTER of COUNT BORUWLASKI

CHARACTER of COUNT BORUWLASKI
BY THE LATE W. BURDON, ESQ. OF HARTFORD, NORTHUMBERLAND.

PRINTED FROM A MANUSCRIPT IN THE HAND-WRITING OF THAT GENTLEMAN.

            BEING intrusted by the Author with the correction and publication of these MEMOIRS, I cannot forbear saying a few words concerning that interesting and amiable individual to whom they relate.

            Though Nature has formed him of size much below the ordinary standard, she has nevertheless endowed him with a mind superior to the generality of men. His talents, though of the lighter kind, are not altogether unequal to serious exertions; and, had they been earlier cultivated, would have left him little below the most profound and intelligent philosophers. As it is, he is most remarkable for his temper and accomplishments,-- for his ingenuity, vivacity, wit, humour, and penetration. He has seen much of mankind in various stations of life; and,. though considered more as a plaything than as a companion, he has omitted no opportunity of making observations on individuals, and on the human species. Few men have a quicker conception than he has; or more readily lay hold of the prominent parts, or represent them with greater humour or greater power of mimicry. His talents for music are of the most agreeable kind: he composes, and plays on the violin and guitar, the most beautiful, little lively airs, with an elegance and facility, that are both rare and astonishing. He dances with all the lightness and ease of an opera performer, and hardly ever tires. His temper is the most agreeable and placid, his feelings lively and correct, and his principles are those of honour, integrity, and gratitude. He never forgets a kindness, nor ever remembers an injury. His head and his heart are equally estimable; and, in short, I cannot naive a man for whose amiable amenity and estimable qualities I have a greater regard.

W. BURDON.
Welbeck-Street, London, May 14, 1818.

 

Prev Next