Foxe's Book of Martyrs -- 198. PAPISTS, EXECUTED THE SAME TIME WITH BARNES, JEROME, AND GARRET.

198. PAPISTS, EXECUTED THE SAME TIME WITH BARNES, JEROME, AND GARRET.

            The same time and day, and in the same place, where and when these three above mentioned did suffer, three others also were executed, though not for the same cause, but rather the contrary, for denying the king's supremacy; whose names were Powel, Fetherstone, and Abel: the which spectacle so happening upon one day, in two so contrary parts or factions, brought the people into a marvellous admiration and doubt of their religion, which part to follow and take; as might so well happen amongst ignorant and simple people, seeing two contrary parts so to suffer, the one for popery, the other against popery, both at one time. Insomuch that a certain stranger being there present the same time, and seeing three on the one side and three on the other side to suffer, said in these words, Deus bone! quomodo hic vivunt gentes? Me suspenduntur papistę, illic comburuntur antipapistę. But to remove and take away all doubt hereafter from posterity, whereby they shall the less marvel how this so happened, here is to be understood how the cause thereof did rise and proceed; which happened by reason of a certain division and discord among the king's council, who were so divided among themselves in equal parts, that the one half seemed to hold with the one religion, the other half with the contrary; the names of whom, although it were not necessary to express, yet being compelled for the setting forth of the truth of the story, we have thought good here to annex, as the certainty thereof came to our hands.

 

PROTESTANTS.

 

Canterbury
Russel, Treasurer.
Suffolk,
Paget,
Viscount Bewchamp,
Sadler,
Viscount Lisle
Audeley.

 

PAPISTS.

 

Winchester,
William Paulet,
Durham,
John Baker,
Norfolk,
Richard, Chancellor of the Augmentation.
Southampton,
Anthony Brown,
Wingfield, Vice-chancellor.

            This division and separation of the council amongst themselves, caused both these parts above mentioned, the one for one religion, the other for another, to suffer together. For, as the one part of the council called for the execution of Barnes, Garret, and Jerome; so the other part, likewise, called for the execution of the law upon Powel, Fetherstone, and Abel; which six, being condemned and drawn to the place of execution, two upon a hurdle, one being a papist, the other a protestant, thus, after a strange manner, were brought into Smithfield, where all the said six together, for contrary doctrine, suffered death; three, by the fire, for the gospel; the other three, by hanging, drawing, and quartering, for popery.

            Alan Cope, in his worshipful Dialogues, making mention of these three aforesaid, Powel, Fetherstone, and Abel, amongst others who died in King Henry's days in the like popish quarrel, that is, for the like treason against their prince, (being in all to the number of twenty-four,) extolleth them not only in words, but with miracles also, up to the height of heaven, among the crowned martyrs and saints of God. To the which Cope, because in this haste of story I have no leisure at this present to give attendance, I shall wait attendance (the Lord willing), another time, to join in this issue with him more at leisure. In the mean time, it shall suffice at this present to recite the names only of those twenty-four rebels, whom he, of his popish devotion, so dignified with the pretended title of martyrs: the names of thirteen of which monkish rebels be these here following:

 

John Houghton,
John Stone,
Robert Laurence,
John Traverse,
Augustine Webster,
William Horne,
Reginald of Sion,
Powell,
John Haile,
Fetherstone,
John Rochester,
Abel
Jacobus Wannere,

            Besides these there were other nine Carthusian monks which died in the prison of Newgate; to which number if you add Master More and the bishop of Rochester, the summa totalis cometh to twenty-four, whom the said Cope unjustly crowned for martyrs. But of these more shall be said (the Lord willing) hereafter.

 

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