Foxe's Book of Martyrs -- 463. CERTAIN CAUTIONS OF THE AUTHOR TO THE READER, OF THINGS TO BE CONSIDERED IN READING THIS STORY.

463. CERTAIN CAUTIONS OF THE AUTHOR TO THE READER, OF THINGS TO BE CONSIDERED IN READING THIS STORY.

            Amongst other escapes and oversights in the edition of this story committed, part of them we leave to thine own gentle castigation, gentle reader: certain other specialties there be, whereof we thought it good and expedient to give thee warning, as hereafter followeth.

            First, when mention is made of Peter's being at Rome, and suffering at Rome, following certain authors; yet forasmuch as other writers there be, and reasons to prove that he was not at Rome, I desire therefore that this my affirmation may not prejudice other men's judgments, if any see or can say further in that matter.

            Touching the story of the Turks, whereas I, in following our Christian authors writing of the Turks, have noted Solyman to be the twelfth Turk after Ottoman, as they do all record; I have found since, by the computation of the Turks set forth in the table of their own descent, the said Solyman to be the sixth emperor of the Turks; and this Solyman his son, which now reigneth, to be but the twelfth. Which I thought here to signify unto thee, because of their own Turkish prophecy noted before, lest, in construing of that prophecy, being in the same place expounded, thou be deceived.

            Item, Where Master George Blage is named to be one of the privy-chamber; here is to be noted also, that although he were not admitted as one of the privy chamber, yet his ordinary resort thither, and to the king's presence there, was such, as, although he were not one of them, yet was he so commonly taken.

            Item, In the story of the duke of Somerset, where it is said, that at the return of the earl of Warwick out of Norfolk, there was a consultation amongst the lords assembling themselves together in the house of Master York, &c., against the duke of Somerset; here is to be noted, that the coming of the lords to the said house of Master York, was not immediately upon the duke of Northumberland's return; but first be went to Warwick, and from thence, after a space, came to the house aforesaid.

            Item, Here is also to be noted touching the said duke of Somerset, that albeit at his death relation is made of a sudden falling of the people, as was at the taking of Christ, this is not to be expounded, as though I compared in any part the duke of Somerset with Christ.

            And though I do something more attribute to the commendation of the said duke of Somerset, which died so constantly in his religion, yet I desire thee, gentle reader, so to take it, not that I did ever mean to derogate or impair the martial praise or facts of other men, which also are to be commended in such things where they well deserved.

            Item, Touching the same duke of Somerset, where the story saith, he was "attainted," read "indicted."

            Item, Where mention is made of one Nicholas Underwood to be the betrayer of the duke of Suffolk; join with the said Underwood also Nicholas Laurence, alias Nicholas Ethel, keeper of Astleypark; who, taking upon him and promising to keep the duke for two or three days, until he might find some means to escape, conveyed him into a hollow tree, and after most traitorously betrayed him.

            Item, In the story of Sir Thomas Wyat there is also to be corrected, that whereas the story saith, that he was taken by Sir Clement Parson, which was not so, and he no such knight, amend it thus: "that he first came to Clarencius, being sent unto him, and afterward yielded him to Sir Maurice Barkley." Briefly and in general, besides these castigations above noted, if thou find any other committed in the printing hereof, gently I desire thee, gentle reader, to bestow a little pains with thine own hand to amend them.

 

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